Tune Tuesdays

Tune Tuesday: January 8, 1929

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Whoopee Image
Image Credit: songbook1.wordpress.com

Ninety years ago, today, the #1 song playing was Makin’ Whoopee, a jazzy-blues piece performed by Eddie Cantor from the Broadway musical comedy Whoopee! The musical was written by William Anthony McGuire, composed by Walter Donaldson (Carolina In The Morning & My Mammy), with lyrics by Gus Kahn (It Had To Be You & Dream A Little Dream Of Me). It was based on the 1923 play The Nervous Wreck by Owen Davis.

American Theatre critic Brooks Atkinson of The New York Times praised Cantor for:

“…a comedian of deftness and appealing humor. He is sad. He is preoccupied. He is apprehensive or insinuating with those floating eyes… In the past he has been funny, clever and ludicrous. But, he has never been so enjoyable.”

Of the music, he states:

“Walter Donaldson has composed an appropriate score worthy of better singing than it falls heir to.”

Apparently, Mr. Atkinson disliked Cantor’s singing ability.

The musical was made into a movie in 1930, also pre-code and Eddie Cantor reprised his role from the musical. There was also a 1979 Broadway revival that did very well.

Synopsis From Wikipedia:

In California, Sheriff Bob Wells and the daughter of a rancher, Sally Morgan, are getting married. She is in love with Wanenis, whose part-Indian heritage presents social difficulties for their romance. Sally abandons Sheriff Bob and their wedding, catching a ride with Henry Williams. As a hypochondriac, Henry has problems of his own but, Sally adds to his problems when she leaves a note saying they have eloped. A chase ensues with the jilted Bob, Mary, Henry’s nurse (who is in love with him) and a cast of others. Along the way, they arrive at the Indian Reservation where Wanenis lives. The movie star Leslie Daw enters the proceedings and sings the torchy, sentimental “Love Me, or Leave Me.”

Trivia Bits:
♦ Eddie Cantor invented the name The March of Dimes for the donation campaigns of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis (polio), a play on the “March of Time” newsreels. He began the first campaign on his own radio show in January 1938, asking people to mail a dime to the nation’s most famous polio victim, President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Other entertainers joined in the appeal via their own shows and the White House mail room was deluged with 2,680,000 dimes.
♦ At one time, when the rights to The Wizard of Oz (1939) were owned by Samuel Goldwyn, Cantor was considered for the role of the Scarecrow. Goldwyn eventually sold the rights to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.
♦ Quote: “Marriage is an attempt to solve problems together which you didn’t have when you were on your own.”

Five Awards

Tune Tuesday: January 1, 1924

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The Charleston Dance Image
Photo Credit: flavorwire.com

Ninety-five years ago, today, (as best as I can tell) the #1 song playing was The Charleston. Composed by James P. Johnson with lyrics by Cecil Mack, it was originally featured in the Broadway musical Runnin’ Wild that premiered in New York on October 29, 1923. It was first recorded by Arthur Gibbs & His Gang and was released November 23, 1923.

This is some fancy foot work.

30-Day Song Challenge: Day 25

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Music Challenge Image
Photo Credit: goodreads.com

A song you like by an artist no longer living…

I’ve already posted some Prince videos and I will have to work hard to keep this post trimmed down.

Can’t do a post like this without The King of Rock and Roll…Elvis. I grew up with this music.


 

Then, we can’t do a post with The King of Pop…Michael. His Off The Wall album was the third album I ever owned, behind Surf & Drag and Grease.


 

Next up, The Queen of Disco…Donna. Her music covered my life from 10 years old to 18.


 

The Beatles were never played in my house. Their music was just not part of my childhood. I discovered who they were after they split up and I liked a lot of solo stuff that came out. My favorite was George. I liked his scratchy, squeaky voice. Paul came in second.


 

This one covers two that have left us…Freddie and Bowie. This song spoke to me at 15 and still does to this day (and I was extraordinarily annoyed when Vanilla Ice ripped it off).


 

This came out after I started college. Teena was the Ivory Queen of Soul.


 

Ok. I’m stopping at seven (I could be here all night). I grew up with this music, as well and still remember all the words. I previously posted my favorite of his songs related to the Gold Rush of 1896. So, I will post my second favorite. I give you Johnny Horton.

30-Day Song Challenge: Day 18

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Music Challenge Image
Photo Credit: goodreads.com

A song from the year you were born…

I read over the long list of songs released in 1966. There’s a lot of good stuff in there and I had a hard time choosing. Here are six absolute favorites, listed in the order they came out:

January
Billboard’s #1 single for 1966


 

April
Also re-released in 1970, a version I dislike.


 

June
#2 on Billboard Hot 100


 

July
#6 on Billboard Hot 100


 

July
#5 on Billboard Hot 100


 

November
#2 on Billboard Hot 100

30-Day Song Challenge: Day 11

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Music Challenge Image
Photo Credit: goodreads.com

A song you never get tired of…

THIS is going to be difficult because there are so many. Looks like a multiple post, again!


 


 


 

Ok. Stopping at three. *SIGH*

Late add…couldn’t stop at three…

Tune Tuesday: November 27, 1998

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Lauryn Hill Image
Photo Credit: billboard.com

Twenty years ago, today, the #1 Billboard Hot 100 and Billboard Hot Rap song was Doo Wop (That Thing) by Lauryn Hill. It debuted at #1, the tenth song in the chart’s history to do so and, the first début single to do so.

Awards
1999 Grammy Awards: Album of the Year, Best R&B Album, Best New Artist, Best Female R&B Vocal Performance & Best R&B Song
1999 American Music Awards: Favorite Soul/R&B New Artist
1999 MTV Video Music Awards (VMA): Video of the Year, Best Female Video, Best R&B Video & Best Art Direction in a Video (Gideon Ponte)
1999 Soul Train Awards: Sammy Davis Jr. Award for Entertainer of the Year (Female), R&B/Soul or Rap Album of the Year, Best Female R&B/Soul Album & The Michael Jackson Award for Best R&B/Soul or Rap Music Video

Nominations
1999 MTV Video Music Awards: Best Hip-Hop Video
1999 Soul Train Awards: Best Female R&B/Soul Single


 

The #1 Billboard Mainstream Top 40 (Pop) song was One Week by the Barenaked Ladies.


 

The #1 Billboard Mainstream Rock and Billboard Alternative Rock song was Fly Away by Lenny Kravitz.


 

The #1 Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop song was Nobody’s Supposed To Be Here by Deborah Cox.


 

The #1 Billboard Hot Country song was Wide Open Spaces by the Dixie Chicks.

Tune Tuesday: November 13, 1988

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The Escape Club Image
Photo Credit: englandunderground.com

Thirty years ago, today, the #1 Billboard Hot 100 song was The Wild, Wild West by The Escape Club, an English pop-rock band out of London (Est. 1983). Curiously, the album and the single didn’t chart in the UK, their home turf.

Nominations:
Breakthrough Video (1989 MTV Video Music (VMA) Awards)
Best Post-Modern Video (1989 MTV VMA)
Best Special Effects In A Video (Nicholas Brandt & Bridget Blake-Wilson/1989 MTV VMA)

 

The #1 Billboard Adult Contemporary (Pop) song was How Can I Fall? by English pop-rock band Breathe, also out of London (Est. 1984).


 

The #1 Billboard Mainstream Rock song was It’s Money That Matters by Randy Newman. [This is Newman’s only #1 hit in any U.S. chart. The only reason this qualifies as rock is because Mark Knopfler is on guitar. ~Vic]


 

The #1 Billboard Alternative song was Desire by U2, Irish rock band out of Dublin (Est. 1976). This had been the #1 Mainstream Rock song one week prior.


 

The #1 Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop song was Giving You The Best That I Got by Anita Baker.


 

The #1 Billboard Hot Country song was Runaway Train by Roseanne Cash.