Tune Tuesdays

Tune Tuesday: November 13, 1988

Posted on

The Escape Club Image
Photo Credit: englandunderground.com

Thirty years ago, today, the #1 Billboard Hot 100 song was The Wild, Wild West by The Escape Club, an English pop-rock band out of London (Est. 1983). Curiously, the album and the single didn’t chart in the UK, their home turf.

Nominations:
Breakthrough Video (1989 MTV Video Music (VMA) Awards)
Best Post-Modern Video (1989 MTV VMA)
Best Special Effects In A Video (Nicholas Brandt & Bridget Blake-Wilson/1989 MTV VMA)

 

The #1 Billboard Adult Contemporary (Pop) song was How Can I Fall? by English pop-rock band Breathe, also out of London (Est. 1984).


 

The #1 Billboard Mainstream Rock song was It’s Money That Matters by Randy Newman. [This is Newman’s only #1 hit in any U.S. chart. The only reason this qualifies as rock is because Mark Knopfler is on guitar. ~Vic]


 

The #1 Billboard Alternative song was Desire by U2, Irish rock band out of Dublin (Est. 1976). This had been the #1 Mainstream Rock song one week prior.


 

The #1 Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop song was Giving You The Best That I Got by Anita Baker.


 

The #1 Billboard Hot Country song was Runaway Train by Roseanne Cash.

Tune Tuesday: November 6, 1983

Posted on Updated on

Kenny Rogers Dolly Parton Image
Photo Credit: sportsandentertainmentnashville.com

Thirty-five years ago, today, the number #1 Billboard Hot 100 song was Islands in the Stream, a duet sung by Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton. Written by the Bee Gees, it was named after the Ernest Hemingway novel (published nine years after his death) and was originally intended for Marvin Gaye. Barry Gibb did a demo for Kenny Rogers (released in November 2006) and, the Bee Gees did two covers of their own in 1997 in Las Vegas with Barry on lead and in 2001 in the studio with Robin on lead.

This song was simultaneously #1 on the Billboard Hot Country chart, the Billboard Adult Contemporary (Pop) chart and the Cash Box Top 100. It also reached #1 in Australia, Austria and Canada (in four different categories).

Awards
Top Vocal Duet (1984 Academy of Country Music (ACM) Awards)
Single Record of the Year~Artist (Dolly Parton/1984 Academy of Country Music (ACM) Awards)
Single Record of the Year~Artist (Kenny Rogers/1984 Academy of Country Music (ACM) Awards)
Single Record of the Year~Producer (Barry Gibb, Alby Galuten & Karl Richardson/1984 Academy of Country Music (ACM) Awards)
Single Record of the Year~Record Company (RCA Records/1984 Academy of Country Music (ACM) Awards)
Favorite Country Single (1984 American Music Awards)

Nominations
Pop Vocal Group (1984 Grammy Awards)
Single of the Year (Dolly & Kenny/1984 Country Music Association (CMA) Awards)
Song of the Year (Barry, Maurice & Robin/1984 Country Music Association (CMA) Awards)
Vocal Duo of the Year (1984 Country Music Association (CMA) Awards)
Favorite Country Band/Duo/Group (1984 American Music Awards)
Favorite Country Male Artist (1984 American Music Awards)
International Single of the Year (1984 Canadian Juno Awards)


 

Lionel Richie Image
Photo Credit: mtonews.com

The #1 Billboard R&B song was All Night Long by Lionel Richie.


 

Huey Lewis & The News Image
Photo Credit: rollingstone.com

The #1 Billboard Mainstream Rock song was Heart and Soul by Huey Lewis & The News.

Tune Tuesday: October 16, 1968

Posted on Updated on

The Beatles Image
Photo Credit: beatles22.weebly.com

Fifty years ago, today, the #1 Billboard Hot 100 song was Hey Jude. Written by Paul McCartney but, credited to Lennon-McCartney, Paul was on the way to see John’s soon-to-be ex-wife Cynthia and their son Julian. Starting out with “Hey Jules”, it evolved to “Hey Jude” as Paul attempted to try and help Julian through his parents’ separation.


 

The Vogues Image
Photo Credit: whitedoowopcollector.blogspot.com

The #1 Billboard Adult Contemporary song was My Special Angel by The Vogues (Five O’Clock World), a song written by Jimmy Duncan. Originally recorded in 1957 by country music singer Bobby Helms (Jingle Bell Rock), The Vogues revived the song. Other performers such as Connie Francis, Bill Haley & His Comets, Bobby Vinton, Frankie Avalon and Floyd Cramer have their own cover versions.


 

James Brown Image
Photo Credit: liveforlivemusic.com

The #1 Billboard R&B song was Say It Loud – I’m Black and I’m Proud (Part I), co-written by James and his bandleader Alfred Ellis. It was a two-part single with Part II on the B-side.


 

Eddy Arnold Image
Photo Credit: elvisaronpresley.altervista.org

The #1 Billboard Hot Country song was Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye by Eddy Arnold. Written by John Loudermilk, it has been covered by The Casinos, Johnny Rivers, Glen Campbell, The Manhattans and Mickey Gilley.

Tune Tuesday: October 9, 1963

Posted on Updated on

Bobby Vinton Image
Photo Credit: popularmusicofthefiftiesandsixties.blogspot.com

We are traveling back to 1963! Fifty-five years ago, today, the #1 Billboard Hot 100 song was Bobby Vinton‘s version of Blue Velvet.

The song was written and composed by Lee Morris and Bernie Wayne (whom also wrote “There She Is”, The Miss America song).

Tony Bennett recorded the first version in 1951 with Percy Faith‘s Orchestra. It’s highest rank was on Cash Box Top 50 at #12. The Clovers (Love Potion No. 9) recorded a version in 1955 that reached #14 on Billboard’s R&B chart.

Though there have been many, many versions of the song recorded, including versions from Bobby Rydell, Brenda Lee, Pat Boone, Sammy Davis Jr., The Lettermen, Isabella Rossellini and Barry Manilow, Bobby Vinton‘s version was the most popular…and my favorite. ~Victoria


 

The #1 Billboard Hot Country song was Abilene (Kansas, not Texas) by George Hamilton IV.


 

The #1 Billboard R&B song was Heat Wave by Martha and The Vandellas. And, I’m pretty sure everyone knows about Linda Ronstadt‘s remake in 1975. It was a great version, too but, it never made it to a #1 position on any chart.

Tune Tuesday: October 2, 1958

Posted on

Alright, kiddies, we are traveling back to the past, again, for some more music. The #1 song sixty years ago, today, was a piece composed by Charles G. “Hell and Maria” Dawes in 1911, the future Vice President of Calvin Coolidge. It’s original name was “Melody In A Major”. Carl Sigman added lyrics in 1951 and Tommy Edwards recorded it. It was a so-so hit, then and, he re-recorded it in 1958. It is the only known #1 single in the U.S. to have been co-written by a U.S. Vice President and a Nobel Peace Prize laureate. Here is…It’s All In The Game.


 

And, the original 1951 version:

National One-Hit Wonder Day

Posted on

National Day Calendar Image

September 25 has six celebrations and one ‘fourth Tuesday in September’ day. With today being Tune Tuesday, I couldn’t pass this up. Today, we honor National One-Hit Wonder Day. And, curiously, the folks at National Day Calender have no idea when this particular celebration was created.

Do you have a favorite one-hit wonder? I have several. But, for today, I will jump back ten years from my previous Tune Tuesday post. I’m a large fan of surfing music, so here are a couple from 1963. ~Victoria

Pipeline by The Chantays peaked at #4 on the Billboard Hot 100 in May 1963.


 

Wipe Out by The Surfaris peaked at #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the Autumn of 1963.


 

Also celebrated today:
National Lobster Day (Yum!)
National Comic Book Day
National Tune Up Day
National Research Administrator Day (That’s a mouthful.)
Math Story Telling Day (Who knew math needed stories…)
National Voter Registration Day (Fourth Tuesday in September)

Cheers and enjoy!

Tune Tuesday: September 25, 1953

Posted on Updated on

We are traveling way, way back, today. The #1 song sixty-five years ago is a piece from the duo Les Paul and Mary Ford…Vaya Con Dios.

In 1953, my mother was six years old and my father was eight….just for some perspective. ~Victoria