Throwback Thursdays

Throwback Thursday: Kathy D. Sullivan & Space

Posted on Updated on

Kathryn D. Sullivan Image
Photo Credit: wikimedia.org

October 11, 1984, Kathryn Dwyer “Kathy” Sullivan became the first American woman astronaut during the STS-41-G mission to perform an EVA or an extravehicular activity (3.5 hours worth), which freely translates to a “space walk”. This was NASA‘s thirteenth flight in the Space Shuttle program and the sixth flight of the Challenger. She was the Mission Specialist 1 and had just turned 33 years of age eight days prior.

She received a Ph.D. in geology from Dalhousie University in 1978, became an Adjunct Professor of Geology at Rice University in 1985 and joined the Navy Reserves in 1988 as an Oceanography Officer, retiring after 18 years at the rank of Captain.

April 24, 1990, she served on board the Space Shuttle Discovery as a Mission Specialist 3 for the STS-31 mission that launched the Hubble Space Telescope. March 24, 1992, she served as Mission Specialist 1 during the STS-45 mission on board the Space Shuttle Atlantis. She was part of the Group 8 NASA Astronaut selection on January 16, 1978. She left NASA in 1993.

Other October 11 space-related trivia:

1957…..Operation Moonwatch scientists calculate Sputnik 1‘s ‘satisfactory orbit’ with an IBM 704.

1958…..NASA launches the lunar probe Pioneer 1 (Pioneer Program). It falls back to Earth and burns up.

1968…..NASA launches Apollo 7, the first crewed flight.

2000…..NASA launches STS-92, the 100th Space Shuttle mission to the ISS via Discovery.

Throwback Thursday: Jim Croce

Posted on Updated on

Jim Croce Image
Photo Credit: ingrid.croces.com (January 10, 1943 – September 20, 1973

Forty-five years ago, today, James Joseph ‘Jim’ Croce, American folk rock singer-songwriter was killed when the Beechcraft E18S, that he and five others were aboard, crashed into a tree during take-off from the Natchitoches Regional Airport in Natchitoches, Louisiana. The accident also claimed the lives of musician Maurice T. ‘Maury’ Muehleisen, comedian George Stevens, manager & booking agent Kenneth Cortese, road manager Dennis Rast and pilot Robert N. Elliott. Croce’s final concert was at Prather Coliseum.

He is buried at Haym Salomon Memorial Park in Frazer, Pennsylvania. His singer-songwriter wife, Ingrid Jacobson Croce maintains an historical site of their work. Their son, Adrian James ‘A. J.’ Croce is a singer-songwriter in his own right.

Croce’s Discography

His two number one singles…


 


 

Behind The Music

Throwback Thursday: Hurricane Ike 2008

Posted on Updated on

Hurricane Ike NOAA Image
Photo Credit: panews.com

While we are on the subject of hurricanes, ten years ago, today, Hurricane Ike struck Galveston, Texas, at 2:10am CDT. It was recorded as a Category 4 on September 4 as it moved near the Leeward Islands. Though it had lessened in strength from its prior Cat4 status to Cat2, this was a bad storm in costs, damage and death. Ike’s storm surge went right over the Galveston Seawall, a ten-mile wall built for protection after the devastating Galveston Hurricane of 1900.

Ike claimed 195 lives…74 in Haiti, six in Cuba and 113 in the US. As of August 2011, 16 are still missing. This was a huge storm that also damaged the Bahamas, the Turks & Caicos, the Florida Panhandle, Mississippi and Louisiana. It is the most expensive storm to ever hit Cuba and, at $38 billion, was the second-costliest storm in US history until 2012.

I was living in Texas when Ike hit. I was too far inland to be affected by more than some rain storms. The terrain in Texas is quite different from North Carolina and even though the Austin Area is roughly the same distance from the Texas coast as the Piedmont/Triangle is from the NC coast, my native Texan friends told me that Austin had never been hit by a hurricane.

I was employed by the very agency that responded to the disaster…The Texas General Land Office, though I was not working in the Coastal Management Unit. I was working for the Veterans Land Board but, I remember the teams going down to help with the clean up and the pictures of the damage that were posted to our intranet. The stunning images of the debris that littered I-45 and the heartbreaking photos of the flooding to downtown Galveston. NASA’s Johnson Space Center (Houston, we’ve had a problem…) suffered roof damage to Mission Control and my beloved Lone Star Flight Museum wound up with $18 million in damaged planes and had to be moved inland to Ellington Field. ~Victoria

Burt Reynolds

Posted on Updated on

Black & White Bandit Image
Photo Credit: revelist.com

February 11, 1936 – September, 6, 2018

A sad Throwback Thursday…(just a little late posting).

He was Ben Frazer for 20 episodes on the TV show Riverboat, 1959-1960. He was Quint Asper for 50 episodes on the TV show Gunsmoke, 1962-1965. He played Detective Lt. John Hawk for one season on the TV show Hawk in 1966. He was Dan August for one season on the TV show of the same name, 1970-1971 (I remember this…vaguely). He was the voice of Troy Garland on the Out of this World TV show for four years, 1987-1991. He was B.L. Stryker for 12 episodes on the TV show of the same name, 1989-1990. He played Wood Newton for four years on the TV show Evening Shade, 1990-1994. He was even on an episode of The X-Files playing God in 2002.

He was Lewis Medlock in the thriller Deliverance, 1972. He was Jay Grobart in The Man Who Loved Cat Dancing, 1973. He was Robert ‘Gator’ McKlusky in White Lightening, 1973. He was Paul ‘Wrecking’ Crewe in The Longest Yard, 1974. He was W.W. Bright in W.W. and the Dixie Dancekings, 1975. He returned in 1976 as ‘Gator’ McKlusky, again, in Gator, the sequel to White Lightening. He was Billy Clyde Puckett in Semi-Tough, 1977. He was “The Greatest Stuntman Alive” Sonny Hooper in Hooper, 1978. He was Phil Potter in Starting Over, 1979. He was J.J. McClure in The Cannonball Run, 1981 (I remember going to this at the theatre with friends). He was Sgt. Thomas Sharky in Sharky’s Machine, 1981. He played the great Sheriff Ed Earl Dodd in The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, 1982. He was Richard Babson in Best Friends, 1982. He was Stroker Ace in the film of the same name in 1983. He was David Fowler in The Man Who Loved Women, 1983 (he did a LOT of loving!). He reprised his role of J.J. McClure in Cannonball Run II, 1984. He was Mike Murphy in City Heat, 1984. He was Tony Church in Rent-A-Cop, 1988. He was John L. Sullivan IV in Switching Channels, 1988. He was Joe Paris in Physical Evidence, 1989 (another one I remember going to the theatre to see). He was the voice of Charlie B. Barkin, the German Shepherd mix in All Dogs Go to Heaven, 1989.

His career slowed down after that but, he roared back to life playing Jack Horner in the 1997 hit Boogie Nights. He returned to the The Longest Yard remake as Coach Nate Scarborough in 2005. He played Boss Hogg in the 2005 film version of the TV show The Dukes of Hazzard. He was Sam LeFleur in Forget About It, 2006. One of his last movies was playing Vic Edwards in The Last Movie Star, a 2017 fitting story of an aging movie star with the bulk of his work behind him. Burt worked until he died, with his last film, Defining Moments, to be released after his death.

Even with all of the above interesting characters he played in a career spanning 60 years, literally, he will always and forever be…Bo Darville…The Bandit. ~Victoria
Smokey and The Bandit, 1977.
Smokey and The Bandit II, 1980.
Smokey and The Bandit Part 3, 1983.

Addendum:
Awards
♡ 1991 Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor/Comedy Series in Evening Shade
♡ 1992 Golden Globe Award for Best Actor/TV Musical or Comedy in Evening Shade
♡ 1998 Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor/Motion Picture in Boogie Nights

Notable Nominations
☆ 1971 Golden Globe Award Nomination for Best Actor/TV Drama in Dan August
☆ 1975 Golden Globe Award Nomination for Best Actor/Motion Picture Musical or Comedy in The Longest Yard (The movie won for Best Musical or Comedy)
☆ 1980 Golden Globe Award Nomination for Best Actor/Motion Picture Musical or Comedy in Starting Over
☆ 1991 Golden Globe Award Nomination for Best Actor/TV Musical or Comedy in Evening Shade
☆ 1992 Primetime Emmy Nomination for Outstanding Lead Actor/Comedy Series in Evening Shade
☆ 1993 Golden Globe Award Nomination for Best Actor/TV Musical or Comedy in Evening Shade
★ 1998 Academy Award Nomination for Best Supporting Actor in Boogie Nights
☆ 1998 BAFTA Award Nomination for Actor/Supporting Role in Boogie Nights
☆ 1998 SAG Award Nomination for Outstanding Performance/Male Actor/Supporting Role in Boogie Nights
☆ 1998 SAG Award Nomination for Outstanding Performance/Cast/Motion Picture in Boogie Nights

The Bandit & Carrie Image
Photo Credit: hollywoodlife.com

 

Throwback Thursday: 1966

Posted on Updated on

My Baby Picture
Personal Collection

Fifty-two years ago, today, I appeared (Hey!). That makes me a Solar Virgoan via Tropical Astrology and a Fire Horse via Chinese Astrology (as are all the folks born January 21, 1966 thru February 8, 1967). I was a mid-morning baby that was a little bit late (it’s warm and comfortable in there) and a full Pisces Moon showed up at 8:14pm EDT. I think I decided to hang out and wait for the full moon (howling). It’s probably why I am so fascinated and attracted to our glorious Moon.

I was born on my maternal Grandmother’s birthday. I used to joke that she and I were 51 years and 35 minutes apart. I was also her only grandchild with a different last name (there ‘were’ 10 of us). On the other side of the family, I was the first girl born into the family in three generations and the only granddaughter. I had my paternal Grandmother all to myself for 12 years. My paternal Grandfather bought a fifth of Old Grandad bourbon which he intended to drink with me when I turned 21. He didn’t make it. I still have the unopened bottle of bourbon. At one time, the label reflected bottling in 1961.

I was a Vietnam War baby. I did a post, earlier in the month, which covers my ‘almost Army Brat’ status. I hadn’t quite reached my third birthday when Neil Armstrong was heard over the air ‘small-stepping & giant-leaping’ and I wasn’t even four, yet, when Jack Swigert told Houston they’d had a problem. I was nine days old when Star Trek boldly debuted.

I was a child of the 70s and a teen of the 80s. I am one of the early Generation X group. I remember watching Scooby Doo, Super Friends and Looney Tunes (Bugs Bunny & Tweety Show) on Saturday mornings. Afternoons after school, it was Sesame Street and The Electric Company. I remember The Carol Burnette Show, The Donnie & Marie Show, Dance Fever and Solid Gold. I loved watching One Day At A Time, Charlie’s Angels, The Bionic Woman, Happy Days and Wonder Woman. I also watched ‘wrastlin’ with my dad and just about every cop show you could think of (he controlled the TV most of the time). I was 11 when I bought my first album Surf & Drag. I was 13 when everyone was wondering “Who shot J.R.?”. I was just shy of my 15th birthday when MTV was born. My first rock concert was The Police: Synchronicity Tour. I also got to see England Dan & John Ford Coley in 1976 at Carowinds with my mom.

I graduated high school at 17 in 1984…yeah, the same year as the scary book. I wasn’t even close to my 20th birthday when I watched the Challenger Space Shuttle explode in stunned silence. Twelve days after my 35th birthday, I watched, again, in stunned silence as two planes flew into the Twin Towers and Flight 93 crashed in rural Pennsylvania. Things were never the same after that day.

So much has changed from the world I grew up in. ~Victoria

People I share a birthday with:
Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin Shelley 1797
Frederick ‘Fred’ Martin MacMurray 1908
Theodore Samuel ‘Ted’ Williams 1918
Kitty Wells (Ellen Muriel Deason) 1919
Geoffrey Beene (Samuel Albert Bozeman, Jr.) 1927
William Edward ‘Bill’ Daily, Jr. 1927
Warren Edward Buffett 1930
John Leonard ‘Jack’ Swigert, Jr. 1931
John Edmund Andrew Phillips 1935
Bruce Leslie McLaren 1937
Frank Edwin ‘Tug’ McGraw, Jr. 1944
Margaret Ann ‘Peggy’ Lipton 1946
Lewis Niles Black 1948
Timothy James Bottoms 1951
Anna Stepanovna Politkovskaya 1958
Gary Ivan Gordon 1960
Alexander Valterovich Litvinenko 1962
Michael Charles Chiklis 1963
Michael Michele Williams 1966

Elvis & Aretha

Posted on Updated on

Gone on the same day, 41 years apart. I was two weeks shy of my 11th birthday when Elvis died. I am two weeks shy of my 52 birthday. Two incredibly beautiful, powerful voices and souls are gone.

May they rock heaven. ~Victoria

Throwback Thursday: Klondike Gold Rush 1896

Posted on

Klondike Gold Rush Image
Photo Credit: history.com

Klondike Rush Routes Image
Photo Credit: wikimedia.org

GOLD! It’s in them, there hills! August 16, 1896, gold was discovered in Dawson City, Bonanza Creek, Klondike River, Yukon, Canada. George Carmack, his wife Kate, her brother ‘Skookum’ Jim Mason (Keish) and Dawson (Tagish) Charlie began looking for gold on one of the river’s tributaries. History is still unclear on ‘who’ actually made the discovery but, George Carmack is generally referred to as the claim maker.

After the panics of 1893 and 1896, economic depression, inflation and unemployment were rampant. The Coinage Act of 1873 had destroyed the use of silver dollar coins, dropping the price of silver and ending bi-metallism. This prompted many to dash to the area in search of gold, leaving behind other jobs in a quest for adventure and financial security. Even author Jack London headed north for his fair share and many of his novels were born out of his experiences. Pacific port towns reaped the benefits of the traders and travelers, desperate to survive the economic downturn.

Very few walked away from Dawson City rich. George and Kate split and, George remarried, living fairly well on his earnings. Skookum Jim, though wealthy, continued to prospect until his death. Dawson Charlie spent money and drank too much, dying in an alcohol related accident. Most of the businessmen and miners died penniless. The damage to the area from the mining was extensive and, the Native people suffered from contaminated water and disease.

Although this song is based on a John Wayne movie, and the George mentioned isn’t the same George in history, it’s still apropos…and, a great song. It’s sad, though, that Johnny Horton died shortly before its release.