Shutterbug Stuff

FOTD: Dandy Lions

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Cee’s Flower of the Day Challenge.

Dandy Lions Image
Riverwalk beauties.
Wild babies.
03-31-2019

Shutterbug Saturday: Frog Strangler Part II

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We continue to have stormy, rainy weather and the temperature has dropped, considerably. We traded floods for tornadoes, yesterday. I learned, today, that two small farms south of town were damaged. I have a healthy respect for Mother Nature. ~Vic

See Part I

Rain Storm Image One
Swollen drainage ditch to the river.
This helped flood my neighbor's backyard.
04-13-2019
Rain Storm Image Two
The tiny creek at Turnip Patch Park took out one of the benches.
Rain Storm Image Three
The Riverwalk is to the far right.
The town closed it for a couple of days.
I saw a juvenile garter snake making its way back across the walk when I was out on the third day.
Rain Storm Image Four
Train trestle in the background.
Rain Storm Image Five
The wooden fence is a barrier between Gold Park & the Eno.
Rain Storm Image Six
That is the bridge I was standing on to photograph the Riverwalk & the trestle.

POTD: Headstones

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Companion photo to my post on April 17. ~Vic

Headstone Wall Image
They don’t know where the graves are for these headstones and many records have been lost.
07-16-2018

Pink Moon 2019

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Ok. So. No full moon pix for today. *sigh* We have been inundated with storms…again. We were bombarded with tornado warnings for five hours. An area just south of town close to I-40 was damaged. I am so glad it’s over.

That being said, I do have some shots of the waxing gibbous moon from April 28, 2018. I suspect I had the same problem during that full moon on April 29 (8:58pm EDT)…bad weather. I also have some waxing gibbous shots from April 16.

Howl for me! ~Vic

Pink Moon 2019 was at 100% illumination at 7:12am EDT.

Pink Moon Image One
Downtown walk.
Waxing Gibbous.
04-28-2018

From Moon Giant:

April’s full moon is widely known as the Full Pink Moon, even though it doesn’t actually turn pastel pink as the name suggests. The Full Pink Moon’s name comes from the abundance of moss phlox, a common little pink flower that typically begins to spread across the ground in early spring. With that said, this creeping phlox is not the only thing that begins blooming during the Full Pink Moon.

In many Native American tribes, April’s full moon is associated with the bustling life and vibrant growth of spring. In Sioux culture, it’s named after the sprouting of red grass. The Comanche tribe called it the New Spring Moon and, both the Tlingit and Sioux tribes referred to it as the Budding Moon, after the new plants that begin to bud and sprout during spring. The Cherokee tribe even called it the Flower Moon (though that name is also sometimes used to refer to May’s full moon) and celebrated it for the growth of useful medicinal plants and magical herbs.

Pink Moon Image Two
Walking back home.

At the same time, April is a time when rivers and streams begin to fully thaw. Accordingly, the Shoshone tribe named April’s full moon the Full Melting Moon and the Arapaho tribe called it the Moon Where Ice Breaks in the River. It was also known as the Fish Moon because of the fish that would begin to swim upstream during this time. The Cherokees believed that flowing water was under the control of a spirit called the Long Man and would perform rituals to honor him during the Full Pink Moon. An example of a ritual like this was the Knee Deep Dance, based off the movements of the Water Frog. The Assiniboine tribe also called April’s full moon the Frog Moon.

Water is not the only thing that starts to flow during the Full Pink Moon. This is also the time where maple sap begins to flow in earnest, marking the true beginning of the incredibly important sugar-making season. The Abenaki tribes called April’s full moon the Sugar Maker Moon, and the Ojibwe called it the Sugarbush Moon. The Ojibwe tribe would journey north to their spring camps to tap maple syrup and engage in spear fishing. Maple syrup was integral to Ojibwe culture. Not only was it a crucial method of seasoning all their foods (they did not have access to salt at that time) but, it also symbolized harmony within the community and with the forces of nature around them.

Pink Moon Image Three
Gold Park
Waxing Gibbous
04-16-2019

The Full Pink Moon also holds religious significance in other cultures. For example, in Islāmic communities around the world, April’s full moon is celebrated as Bara’at Night, also known as the Night of Innocence. Muslims offer up prayers, asking God to absolve dead ancestors of their sins. They also prepare sweet desserts such as halwa or zarda and give it out to children, the needy and other members of their community. Meanwhile, Christians call it the Paschal Moon and celebrate the first Sunday after April’s full moon as Easter Sunday. It’s possible that the reason why the Easter Bunny brings eggs is because April’s full moon is also known as the Egg Moon, given that animals such as geese begin mating and laying eggs in spring.

Pink Moon Image Four
Riverwalk

From Farmers Almanac:

While April is known for its showers and ever-warming temperatures, it is also known as a month when spring flowers begin to show up. The name came from the herb moss pink or wild ground phlox which is one of the earliest widespread flowers of the spring. As the name infers, the flowers are pink in color, thus the name for April’s full Moon. But no, the Moon itself won’t be turning pink.

Tribes kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full Moon. Full Moon names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred. There was some variation in the full Moon names but, in general, the same ones were consistent among regional tribes. European settlers followed that custom and created some of their own names.

Other names for this month’s celestial body include the Full Sprouting Grass Moon, the Egg Moon and, among coastal tribes the Full Fish Moon, because this was the time that the shad swam upstream to spawn.

Also referred to as:
Grass Moon
Hare Moon

Western Washington University Native American Moons
American Indian Moon Names

FOTD: Unusual

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Out on one of my walks, several of these happy things were poking out through the wrought iron fence. I haven’t the first clue what this is but, it’s flower-ish, I suppose. It is quite striking. If anyone knows what this is, SPEAK. ~Vic

Cee’s Flower of the Day Challenge

Unusual Image
Strange, pretty plant.
04-10-2019

POTD: Spring Sunshine

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Spring Sunshine Image
Margaret Lane Slave Cemetery
This was our first clear blue sky after all the storms and water.
04-15-2019

FOTD: Creeping Phlox

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I love these happy little flowers and they come in so many colors. ~Vic

Cee‘s FOTD challenge.

Creeping Phlox Image
Walking around town.
04-10-2019