Shutterbug Stuff

Snow Moon 2019

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Snow Moon Image One
All Photos Are My Personal Collection
Rising over the park.

From MoonGiant:

As the snowiest month in the United States, February’s full moon is commonly known as the Full Snow Moon in Native American cultures. These ancient tribes named this moon after the way trees cracked in the cold or how people had to sit shoulder to shoulder around the fire for warmth. Even the Celts called it the Moon of Ice. As expected of the coldest month in the year, the Full Snow Moon is also known by more sinister names, such as the Bone Moon. The Cherokee tribe called February’s full moon the Bone Moon because, by this point, the tribe’s winter food supplies had usually dwindled to the point where people had to gnaw on bones and cook bone marrow soup in order to survive. For the same reason, the Kalapuya tribe called this moon the Out of Food Moon. Appropriately, it’s also known as the Hunger Moon and the Little Famine Moon. Perhaps, due to this month’s association with death, the Cherokee tribe would commune with their dead ancestors during the Bone Moon. A didanawiskawi, or a medicine person, would host a medicine dance for the community. Fasting and rituals for the dead were also common practices.

Snow Moon Image Two
Peaking over the courthouse.

However, not all cultures associate February’s full moon with extreme cold and death. The Hopi tribe calls it the Moon of Purification and Renewal, which is very fitting because the Full Snow Moon is usually the very first full moon of the year according to the lunar calendar. Cultures that follow the lunar calendar, especially East Asian cultures, tend to associate the Full Snow Moon with new beginnings for this very reason. The ancient Chinese, for example, called it the Budding Moon. As a matter of fact, celebrations of February’s full moon are the climax of Lunar New Year festivities in various East Asian countries. In China, the Full Snow Moon is celebrated during the Lantern Festival, also known as the Yuanxiao Festival, which is the 15th day of the Lunar New Year. During this festival, the Chinese release kongming lanterns into the sky as they admire the full moon and eat tangyuan, glutinous rice balls that are usually filled with sweet paste. The round shape of the balls symbolize family togetherness and bring good luck to the whole family.

Snow Moon Image Three
Walking home and below a street light.

Many East Asian cultures in general also light lanterns and bonfires to celebrate February’s full moon. According to an ancient Chinese legend, not long after Buddhism was brought into China, 17 deities were witnessed flying through the sky during the first full moon of the Lunar New Year. Shocked and excited, the populace lit fires and lanterns to see the godly beings better. They continued to do so year after year but, for more practical reasons – to chase away pests and to pray for a good crop in the upcoming spring. In Korea, where February’s full moon is known as Daeboreum, these fiery structures are called “Houses of the Burning Moon”. During Daeboreum, Koreans hike mountains, despite the freezing temperatures, in order to catch a glimpse of the first rise of the first full moon of the Lunar New Year. According to legend, the very first person to accomplish this feat will have their dearest wish come true.

Snow Moon Image Four
Glowing above the trees.

From Farmers’ Almanac:

Among the Micmac people of eastern Canada, the driving winds that often accompany February snows led to the name Snow-Blinding Moon. Because this month’s typically harsh weather conditions made hunting very difficult, other common names for February’s Moon included the Hunger Moon, Bony Moon, and Little Famine Moon. To the early American colonists, the optimal time for trapping beaver, fox and mink was the dead of winter when these animals’ coats were at their fullest. So, to them, February’s moon was known as the Trapper’s Moon.

Snow Moon Image Five
From my driveway.

From a Wiccan site I stumbled across while ‘Googling’ (or ‘Binging’) a particular name, additional names not listed above are Storm Moon, Horning Moon, Wild Moon, Red & Cleansing Moon, Quickening Moon, Big Winter Moon, Moon When Trees Pop and Chaste Moon. And, there is quite an extensive list of Native American moons on Skywise Unlimited.

100% illumination will occur at 10:53am EST.

Howl for me! ~Vic

Shutterbug Saturday: Living History

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Living History Day Image One
Brochure

Today was Living History Day. I didn’t make it to the festivities but, my buddy Ray did. The weather was just too damp for me and I was busy with other things. He graciously provided me with copies to post and four short video clips.

This area (a five county span) was a hotbed of struggle during the War of the Regulation, the Battle of Alamance, the Revolutionary War, the Battle of Guilford Court House, the Civil War and was the site of the last & largest Confederate Surrender. We, collectively, have seen a lot.

We also have a lot of actors and reenactments. Some of the uniforms and gear are quite impressive. Hopefully, I will make it next year.

The Captain Image Two
Photo Credit: All Images Are From A. R. Tutterow
Oh, Captain, My Captain
The Drummers Image Three
Young drummers. You can’t march without a beat.
Redcoats Image Four
The line-up.
Redcoats Image Five
Rogue ammunition.
The Women Image Six
Era clothing and food.
Farm Office Image Seven
This building was used as an office by Confederate Generals Wade Hampton & Joseph E. Johnston. It was built in 1850 & moved to this location in 1983. The Visitor’s Center in the background, a former farm-house, wasn’t built until 1790.
The Hessian Image Eight
Hessian Uniform
German Mercenary

Ray had a little trouble keeping his filming steady. Overcast skies can interfere with viewing ability. Apologies.


 


 


 

Flashback Friday: Funny Fotos Part I

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Camera Image One
Photo Credit: Joseph Chan on Unsplash

I’ve been digging around in some old images on my computer. There was a rash of cube farm/office humor that circulated on emails back in the middle 2000s. They may have eventually made it to Facebook but, I don’t remember seeing these. Anyway, I thought I would share some silliness. These were labeled “Cutbacks” and someone went to a lot of trouble for the detail. I will hit you up with some more next Friday. They are not mine and I have no idea where they originated from.

Fridge Image Two
Cardboard fridge.
Cardboard Office Image Three
I love the cardboard CD.
Cardboard Office Image Four
Even cardboard wrist rests.
Cardboard Office Image Five
NOT a Bush/Cheney fan. Love the “Whatever, You Moron” bunny.
Cardboard Office Image Six
Makeshift printers.
Cardboard Office Image Seven
And, a Dell chair.
Cardboard Office Image Eight
New power generation.

Shutterbug Saturday: Completely Rotten…

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Oliver Image One
All Photos Are My Personal Collection
(Oliver, the ginger Hemingway)
Because the water tastes SO much better in here.
10-24-2017
Oliver Image Two
I like your chair, Mommy.
12-07-2017
Oliver Image Three
What?
12-15-2017
Oliver Image Four
Crunch, crunch, crunch…
05-03-2018
Oliver Image Five
It’s too BRIGHT.
12-04-2018

Lord, he is a case. ~Vic

Foto Friday: Sunsets Local

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Sunset Image One
All Photos Are Personal Collection
Food Lion parking lot as storm clouds rolled through.
07-12-2016
Sunset Image Two
My neighborhood.
12-12-2016
Sunset Image Three
Evening walk.
11-05-2017
Sunset Image Four
Up the street.
11-11-2017
Sunset Image Five
Late Spring walk.
06-02-2018
Sunset Image Six
Phoenix in the sky.
08-06-2018
Sunset Image Seven
Cotton on fire.
09-18-2018
Sunset Image Eight
Riverwalk
01-06-2019
Sunset Image Nine
Sunset blur thru the window.
01-29-2019
Sunset Image Ten
Pink glow this past Sunday.
02-03-2019

I have SO many pictures to share. ~Vic

Shutterbug Saturday: Tribute Pictures VII

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Texas & American Flag Image One
Photo Credit: Matthew T. Rader on Unsplash

I have reached the end of my tribute. I have showcased all that he sent me. Previous posts:
Part I
Part II
Part III
Part IV
Part V
Part VI

I have missed my life in Texas and I still miss him. He was such an interesting man. He wasn’t perfect but, he was himself and he charmed. Thank you for sharing your life with me, Sir.

RIP W. H. Patton (July 16, 1939 – July 21, 2012)

Patton Image Two
Shot of him at about ten years old.
He wanted to drive the 1938 Ford in the background.
I think his cousin took this.
Patton Image Three
He loved this 1934 Oldsmobile.
Patton Image Four
His journalism years.
Patton Image Five
He always had a guitar or two on stands ready to play.
Patton Image Six
He disliked this photo.
1970s perms were not his friend.
Discussing business.
Patton Image Seven
Cattle show in 1978.
Wife Glenda, son Sean & daughter Shari.
Patton Image Eight
Young Glenda.
Love of his life.

Patton Image Nine
Texas Tech University graduation picture.
1961

 

One last bonus photo…

Patton Image Eleven
Taking pictures at my wedding.
Always the photographer.
September 2004

Foto Friday: Tribute Pictures Part VI

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Big Bend National Park Image One
Big Bend National Park, West Texas
Photo Credit: Natalie Rhea Riggs on Unsplash

The below is now Part Six of the final Seven Part Series showcasing my former supervisor’s work and, additional photos taken of him at various stages of his life and career. The above picture of Big Bend National Park, I never got to see while I was living in Texas. It’s a big state and there is a lot to see. I confess that I spent a rather large amount of time traveling back and forth, between the Austin area and the Houston area, as I had a very dear friend and classmate living in Spring. Texas will always be my second home.

Part I
Part II
Part III
Part IV
Part V

Snowfall In Clyde Image Two
Wintertime in Clyde on his ranch.
This picture has no time stamp. I haven’t a clue when it was taken.
Gobbler Image Three
Gobbler with his hens.
03-24-2010
Gobbler Image Four
Strutting around.
03-24-2010

Gobbler Image Five
He is gorgeous.
03-24-2010

 

The following three pictures, he sent to me on November 17, 2008. I have no idea when or where these were taken but, they were his friends and they requested his expertise.

Dolly Parton Image Six
Dolly

Kenny Rogers Image Seven
Kenny
He is from Houston.

Mac David Image Eight
Mac
He is from Lubbock.

 

That is all I have of the pictures he took. Everything forward will be of him.

Bill Shrimp Boat Image Nine
On a shrimp-boat, somewhere…1964

Last post, tomorrow. ~Vic