Movie Mondays

Movie Monday: November 19, 1998

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Rugrats Image
Photo Credit: gizmodo.com

Twenty years ago, today, the #1 movie at the box office was The Rugrats Movie.
Voice cast:
Elizabeth Daily (billed as E. G. Daily)…….Tommy Pickles
Jack Riley…….Stu Pickles
Melanie Chartoff (Principal Grace Musso from Parker Lewis Can’t Lose)…….Didi Pickles & Grandma Minka Kropotkin
Tara Strong…….Dil Pickles
Joe Alaskey…….Grandpa Lou Pickles
Michael Bell…….Drew Pickles, Chas Finster & Grandpa Boris Kropotkin
Tress MacNeille…….Charlotte Pickles
Cheryl Chase…….Angelica Pickles
Christine Cavanaugh (the original voice of Babe and Amanda Nelligan in The X-Files episode Small Potatoes)…….Chuckie Finster
Kath Soucie…….Phil, Lil & Betty DeVille
Phil Proctor…….Howard DeVille
Cree Summer…….Susie Carmichael

Notable Guest Stars:
Tim Curry…….Rex Pester
Whoopi Goldberg…….Ranger Margaret
David Spade…….Ranger Frank
Roger Clinton, Jr. (younger half-brother of President Bill Clinton)…….Air Crewman
Margaret Cho…….Lt. Klavin
Busta Rhymes…….Reptar Wagon

Notable Baby Singers:
Beck
Cindy Wilson (B-52s)
Dawn Robinson (En Vogue)
Fred Schneider (B-52s)
Gordon Gano (Violent Femmes)
Iggy Pop
Jakob Dylan
Kate Pierson (B-52s)
Lenny Kravitz
Lisa Loeb
Lou Rawls
Patti Smith

Awards:
BMI Film Music Award (1999/BMI Film & TV Awards)
Favorite Cartoon (1999/Kids’ Choice Awards, USA)

Six Nominations

Movie Monday: November 12, 1993

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Three Musketeers 1993 Image One
Photo Credit: pinterest.com
Three Musketeers 1993 Image Two
Photo Credit: film1.nl

Twenty-five years ago, today, the #1 film at the box office was The Three Musketeers, starring:
Charlie Sheen
Kiefer Sutherland
Chris O’Donnell
Oliver Platt
Tim Curry (The original Pennywise)
Rebecca De Mornay
Gabrielle Anwar
Michael Wincott
Paul McGann (Doctor Who #8)

A summary from IMDB:

“A Disney-ized re-telling of Dumas’ classic swashbuckling story of three swordsmen of the disbanded French King’s Guard, plus one young man who dreams to become one of them, who seek to save their King from the scheming of the Cardinal Richelieu. Jokes and stunts are the expected fare in this light-hearted and jaunty adventure.”

It was, apparently, panned by critics but, clearly, did well for Disney. The first song from the soundtrack, All For Love, had some notable success as well. Written by Bryan Adams, John “Mutt” Lange and Michael Kamen and, sung by Adams, Rod Stewart & Sting, it reached #1 in 1994 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, the Billboard Mainstream Top 40 chart, the Eurochart Hot 100, the Canadian RPM chart and, 11 other countries.

Awards:
Most Performed Song From A Film (Michael Kamen/1995 Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI) Film & TV Awards)
Most Performed Songs From Motion Pictures (Bryan Adams, Robert John Lange & Michael Kamen/1995 American Society of Composers, Authors & Publishers (ASCAP) Film & Television Music Awards)

Nominations:
Best Editing ~ Sound Effects (Tim Chau/1994 Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE) Golden Reel Award)
Best Movie Song (Bryan Adams, Rod Stewart & Sting/1994 MTV Movie & TV Awards)
Worst Supporting Actor (Chris O’Donnell/1994 Golden Raspberry (Razzie) Awards)

Interesting Trivia Bits from the Disney Movie Database.

Movie Monday: October 22, 1978

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Boys From Brazil Image
Photo Credit: filmexcess.blogspot.com

Forty years ago, today, the #1 movie at the box office was The Boys From Brazil starring Gregory Peck, Laurence Olivier, James Mason, Rosemary Harris, Anne Meara & Steve Guttenberg. Laurence Olivier was nominated for Best Actor (Academy Awards). Robert Swink was nominated for Film Editing (Academy Awards) and Jerry Goldsmith was nominated for Original Music Score (Academy Awards). Gregory Peck was nominated for Best Motion Picture Actor in a Drama (Golden Globes) for his portrayal of Josef Mengele.

Movie Monday: October 15, 1973

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Streisand & Redford Image
Photo Credit: nydailynews.com

Ok, folks. I am shifting things a bit. What used to be Flick Friday is now Movie Monday! *applause*applause* All blogs change and evolve…and, we’re off…

Forty-five years ago, today, the #1 movie at the box office was The Way We Were, a film described as a romantic drama. It’s drama alright. Directed by Sydney Pollack, it is a period piece based upon a novel by Arthur Laurents. He wrote about his college days at Cornell University and his experience with HCUA, which ultimately led to Hollywood Blacklisting. I’m not going to comment any further on the details as it is a little too close to the political nonsense of today.

That being said, Marvin Hamlisch won two Oscars for Best Original Score and Best Original Song.