Beauty

Shutterbug Saturday: Tribute Pictures V

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Austin Skyline Photo One
Austin Skyline
1st Street Bridge
Town Lake (Colorado River)
Photo Credit: Carlos Delgado on Unsplash

It appears that I have more Patton pictures than I realized. Some of them are of him, not by him. Nevertheless, this is looking like a seven part series, now.

Part I
Part II
Part III
Part IV

Roadrunner Photo Two
Roadrunner on the bird bath
06-04-2008
Roadrunner Photo Three
Getting a drink
08-27-2008
Forest Fire Photo Four
Clyde County Forest Fires
02-24-2009
Forest Fire Photo Five
Little too close for comfort
Forest Fire Photo Six
Dropping water
Forest Fire Photo Seven
Flame retardant
Abilene Parade Photo Eight
Abilene Parade
05-08-2008
Clydesdales Photo Nine
Budweiser Clydesdales

More to come… ~Vic

Foto Friday: Tribute Pictures Part IV

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Texas Photo One
Photo Credit: Glen Carrie on Unsplash

This is part four of a five, possibly, six part series showcasing my former supervisor W. H. Patton’s photography. The first post is here. The second post is here. The third post is here.

Round four…

Starlings Photo Two
Starlings everywhere…
10-09-2008
Starlings Photo Three
Backyard bird bath
10-09-2008
Fox Photo Four
Visiting fox
02-21-2008
Fox Photo Five
Another fox six days later
02-27-2008
Turkey Photo Six
Strutting gobbler
03-07-2009
Turkey Hens Photo Seven
Turkey hens on the bird bath
03-07-2009
Copper Photo Eight
His grandson’s puppy Copper
05-18-2008
Copper Photo Nine
Adorable Copper
05-18-2008

Shutterbug Saturday: 2018 Christmas Local Part II

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Christmas 2018 Image One
Personal Collection 12-24-2018
Beautiful home a block away.

Part II of 2018 Christmas reflections.

Christmas 2018 Image Two
Cute house across the street.
Christmas 2018 Image Three
First Baptist Church around the corner. Est. 1853
Christmas 2018 Image Four
First Baptist Church side entrance.
Christmas 2018 Image Five
Nash-Hooper House
Registered National Historic Landmark
Built in 1772 by Francis Nash
Was home to William Hooper 1782-90
Christmas 2018 Image Six
Lovely home three blocks away.
Christmas 2018 Image Seven
Recently restored 1920s home.
Christmas 2018 Image Eight
Gorgeous bungalow across the street from the First Baptist Church.
Christmas 2018 Image Nine
Christmas in a small town.
Christmas 2018 Image Ten
Merry Christmas!

Foto Friday: 2018 Christmas Local

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Christmas 2018 Image One
Personal Collection 12-24-2018
Iron Reindeer & Sled

Foto Friday, local flair…something a little different from Shutterbug Saturday.

Christmas 2018 Image Two
The Crawford House
Iron Sled & Reindeer in the background.
Christmas 2018 Image Three
Santa @ The Old Courthouse
Christmas 2018 Image Four
Jolly Elf
Christmas 2018 Image Five
Methodist Church
Christmas 2018 Image Six
Efland-Forrest House
Christmas 2018 Image Seven
Can you see the dinosaur with the Santa hat?
Christmas 2018 Image Eight
Psalm & Scarf Tree in front of the Fire Station.
Christmas 2018 Image Nine
Psalm 134:3
Christmas 2018 Image Ten
Take if you have need…

More to come… ~Vic

Cold Moon 2018

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Cold Moon Image One
All Photos…Personal Collection

From Moon Giant:

The December full moon is commonly known in the Northern Hemisphere as the Full Long Nights Moon. It takes its name from the Winter Solstice which has the longest night in the year. The Full Long Nights Moon cuts a soaring trajectory through the wintry skies, in direct opposition to the low-hanging sun. The Algonquins called this full moon the Cold Moon in reference to the cold light it casts upon long winter nights. Strangely enough, in certain other cultures, December’s full moon can actually be associated with warmth.

Cold Moon Image Two

To the Deborean Clan, the Cold Moon is associated with staying in your cosy home beside a crackling fireplace, surrounded not just by physical warmth but, also the warmth of family and friends. Similarly, the Wishram tribe named December’s full moon the Winter Houses Moon. Given that it coincides with holidays like Yule, Pagans consider this the perfect time to open up your home and provide warmth to those you love, as well as to those who are most vulnerable to the cold of winter.

Cold Moon Image Three

For those who are more inclined towards solitude, the Full Long Nights Moon provides an excellent opportunity to enjoy your cosy home in peace and quiet. Consider taking lots of restful naps under warm, fluffy comforters or allowing yourself to lounge in bed in the mornings instead of rising immediately to work. Appropriately, the Native American Zuni tribe called December’s full moon the Moon Where the Sun Comes Home to Rest. This full moon is a great time for you to take a long overdue break and recharge, so that you may shine all the brighter when it comes time for you to rise again.

Cold Moon Image Four

This period of slow restfulness is also very conducive to introspection. When you look inwards and take stock of your life during this time, try to focus on loose ends and the little things that you’ve left hanging throughout the year. As the last full moon that rises before the year draws to a close, the Full Long Nights Moon is a time of endings. Take advantage of this full moon’s energy and bring an end to tasks you’ve been meaning to do, clearing your mind so you can move forward with a clean slate.

Cold Moon Image Five
The phone always has a light ‘echo’.

As much as the Full Long Nights Moon may be about endings, it is also about beginnings and rebirth. The Sioux Indians’ name for December’s full moon is the Moon When Deer Shed Their Horns, thus beginning the process of growing new ones. The Celts, on the other hand, call it the Elder Moon. Elder is fragile and easily damaged but, it’s also full of vitality and recovers very quickly. As the Elder Moon shines upon you, allow yourself to rest and heal from everything that has hurt you over the year and, focus instead on new beginnings and promising areas of growth. This is an excellent time to start planning your New Year’s resolutions and set exciting new goals for the upcoming year.

Cold Moon Image Six
I got some stars in this one.

From Moon Connection:

The full moon name often used by Christian settlers is the Moon Before Yule.

From Farmers Almanac:

Winter Solstice 2018

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Winter Solstice Image
Photo Credit: harmoniousheartwellness.com

I was hoping to capture some images of the Moon, tonight but, we are so overcast from the rain storms, it’s just not going to happen. I will try tomorrow night.

Winter is officially here, as if all the snow we’ve had wasn’t a clue. The solstice arrived at 5:23pm EST and tomorrow’s Full Moon will be at 100% full illumination at 12:48pm EST. From The Almanac:

The word solstice comes from Latin sol “sun” and sistere “to stand still.” In the Northern Hemisphere, as summer advances to winter, the points on the horizon where the Sun rises and sets advance southward each day. The high point in the Sun’s daily path across the sky, which occurs at local noon, also moves southward each day.

At the winter solstice, the Sun’s path has reached its southernmost position. The next day, the path will advance northward. However, a few days before and after the winter solstice, the change is so slight that the Sun’s path seems to stay the same, or stand still. The Sun is directly overhead at “high-noon” on Winter Solstice at the latitude called the Tropic of Capricorn.

The solstice is the beginning of astronomical winter. (An almanac is defined as a “calendar of the heavens,” so we use the astronomical definition.) Astronomical seasons are based on the position of the Earth in relation to the Sun. However, meteorological seasons are based on the annual temperature cycle. For the ancient Celts, the calendar was based around the solstices and equinoxes, marking the Quarter Days, with the mid-points called Cross-Quarter Days.

Winter Fairy Image
Photo Credit: bwallpapers.com

This is the longest night of the year. It is a time for rest and reflection. Just like Spring cleaning time, the beginning of Winter can herald a cleaning of its own. Cold temperatures and bad weather can mean more time indoors. It can be a time for sifting through the past or contemplating the future. Many may find that re-evaluating relationships and possessions is easier during this slower time. I will be lighting a candle and smudging. Wishing everyone health and happiness. ~Vic

Snow Bombs: 2018

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Rocking Chair Image One
Personal Collection 12-09-2018

Have mercy…two big snowstorms in one year. This is reminding me of my childhood. I remember lots of snow and lots of snowmen in the 70s. I also remember folks being more mobile back then, too. Anytime there was a snow forecast, my dad was putting chains on the back tires of the ’72 Charger. Everybody got chains and off they went. Even in the early 80s, a manual, front-wheel-drive compact would pretty much get you anywhere. My 1977 Honda Civic and my 1983 Toyota Tercel took me where I wanted to go. People just don’t do that anymore. Cars these days are definitely more fragile and lighter than the metal monsters of yesteryear.

I remember zipping around in the snow in the middle 80s (college days) in my Civic. One particular trip, I was headed to a friend’s place for snacks, movies and snowballs. I was approaching an intersection that included a railroad crossing (with roads and individual intersections on either side) and a steep, short hill on the other side of it. The light was red as I cleared the tracks but, my Civic became excited about the hill-induced inertia and my attempt to slow down (tapping said brakes lightly) only brought my ass end around. Just as the light turned green, I slid sideways, all the way thru the intersection. Once my Civic was done having fun (yes, I’m blaming it on the car), I came to a stop, hitting nothing…and, nothing hitting me…and, then, proceeded on my way. If it were today, I’d either be dead or, viral on social media.

Today

Side Door Image Two
Hmmm…little difficult opening the side door
Covered Mum Image Three
There really is a Mum under there
Cedar Tree Image Four
Heavy Cedar limbs
Adirondack Chairs Image Five
My Adirondacks are nearly covered.

January 17

Mighty Oak Image Six
Personal Collection 01-17-2018
Majestic, mighty Oak across the street
Dogwood Image Seven
Cold little Dogwood
Mr. Maple Image Eight
Mr. Maple in the front yard
Lonely Tree Image Nine
Lonely tree in the empty lot up the street
Ollie Image Ten
Seriously, Mommy? What IS this stuff?