Author: The Hinoeuma

Movie Monday: January 14, 1939

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Kentucky 1938 Image
Image Credit: imdb.com

Eighty years ago, today, the #1 film at the box office was Kentucky, a Romeo & Juliet type film with elements of the Hatfields & McCoys thrown in. Starring Loretta Young, Richard Greene and Walter Brennan, the backdrop of the story is horseracing.

IMDB Summary:

During the Civil War, two of the oldest families in Kentucky, the Dillons and the Goodwins, begin a long and bitter feud that has lasted into 1938. When Jack Dillon refuses to enter his father’s banking business he, under an assumed name, gets a job as a trainer in Sally Goodwin’s stables. A romance develops between them. When Sally’s father dies, the entire estate, including the horses, has to be sold at auction to pay his debts. A note turns up left by Sally’s father that, according to a wager made between him and the elder Dillon, any one horse in the Dillon stable can be claimed by the Goodwins. Complications arise when Sally finds out that Jack is a Dillon.

Trivia Bits:
♦ A number of famous Kentucky-bred champion racehorses are presented including Gallant Fox, Omaha, Hard Tack, Chance Play and Man of War, who is called the greatest racehorse.
♦ Two Kentucky Derby winners, Willie “Smokey” Saunders and Charlie Burrell, were employed for the film.
Don Ameche was originally cast for the male lead but, was replaced by Richard Greene after undergoing a tonsillectomy.
Arleen Whelan was originally scheduled for the female lead.

Award:
Best Supporting Actor (Walter Brennan/1939 Academy Awards)

There’s not really a trailer for this movie but, I did find this:

DNA: Two, 12 or 13 Strands?

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A PDF Essay From: The Chris Thomas Files

DNA Image One
Image Credit: blogs.discovermagazine.com

Understanding DNA

We are all aware of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) but, very few of us actually know what it does in the cell structures of the body. Medically, it is described as:

“The very long molecule that winds up to form a chromosome and that contains the complete code for the automatic construction of the body. The molecule has a double helix skeleton of alternating sugars (deoxyribose) and phosphates…”

But this is far from being the whole story.

In recent years, we have seen an increase in the number of workshops being offered, sometimes at considerable expense, to help people raise their number of DNA strands from the traditional two to twelve. So, what is the benefit of changing our DNA in this way? Is it a benefit, or even desirable, to change the coding “for the automatic construction of the body”? To understand these questions, we first must understand what DNA actually is.

The Construction of the Human Body

We are used to hearing from scientists that the body is a collection of cells which seem to follow some sort of pattern, of which DNA plays a part, and somewhere or other, we have a consciousness. From a religious viewpoint, we are told that we are a body that has, somewhere or other, a soul. The terms “consciousness” and “soul” mean very much the same thing but, are used separately to differentiate between the scientific view and the religious view. Most people believe that we are a body that has a soul (consciousness) but, are unsure of where that soul is. The reality is that we are a soul that builds for itself a body…not a body that has a soul but, a soul that has a body.

In order for the soul to take on a physical body, it borrows the “etheric template” of a human body, makes a copy and begins to build the body inside the womb. When the father’s sperm meets the mother’s egg, an automatic process is begun that is a function of the fertilisation process (the soul does not connect at this stage) and all that really happens is that the egg begins to divide. From both parents, the new foetus “borrows” some aspects of both parent’s DNA. These are basic characteristics such as skin colour and hair colour…no more than that, everything else about the foetus is determined by the soul of the incoming child. After about 800 cell divisions, the soul of the foetus makes its first connection to the growing bundle of dividing cells. At this stage, the soul is not connected to the cells but, begins to imprint the etheric template. After about 16 days, the soul’s connection to the foetus begins to strengthen and it is at this stage that DNA begins to play its role.

DNA Structure Image Two
Image Credit: terravivos.com

At this stage in a foetus’s development, DNA breaks down into 2 separate parts:
[1] Seventy-five percent of the total DNA is the storage of memories from past lives. If an experience in a past life needs to be resolved within the body during this lifetime then, the memories of that past life trauma are added at this point. These memories can take the form of a disability, such as a missing limb or, they can be as a result of the past life event imprinted into the body for this life. For example, if a previous life ended by your being shot to death, the memory of the bullet wounds can show themselves as moles on the skin.

[2] The remaining 25 percent of the total DNA is needed to construct the physical tissues of the body around the etheric template. As the foetus grows, this percentage gradually drops until, at birth, only about ten percent is needed to continue the body’s development. At puberty, when the body has effectively stopped growing, the percentage drops to about three percent. This three percent is the amount of DNA that keeps the body functioning for the remainder of its life. When doctors claim that they have worked out how DNA works, it is this three percent of which they speak whilst claiming that the remaining 97 percent is “junk”.

However, from puberty onwards, the function of DNA breaks down like this:
[1] Seventy-five percent is the storage of past life memories.
[2] Three percent maintains the body’s physical processes.
[3] Twenty-two percent records memories of the events that take place in this lifetime.

Physical memories are only stored in the brain for very short-term periods, only a couple of years at most. Long term memory is stored within the DNA. This is the reason why the elderly can remember very little of their recent lives but, can remember their earlier life in great detail. As the cell structures of the brain begin to break down as we become older, much of the short-term memory is lost whereas the long-term, DNA, memory is fully intact and becomes easier for the elderly to access these memories as their brain cells become less efficient. This is the actual make up of DNA. It is principally memory.

The Higher Self and The Physical Self

A Human Being is defined, by the Earth, as a physical being that contains the whole of the soul. When we first came to Atlantis, this is the state in which humans were. However, we encountered problems and, eventually, decided to divide the soul into two parts. The soul was to be divided into the “physical self”, about 25 percent of the total soul and, the “higher self”, the remaining 75 percent of the soul. This division took place about 7,000 years ago and we have been in this divided state ever since (see Synthesis). However, we set ourselves a time limit of 7,000 years to find a way to re-merge the two aspects of the soul back into the physical body. This is the process we are currently undergoing.

To understand what this means, we need to take a further look at the body/soul connection. As can be seen from earlier, the soul begins to make a very tentative connection with the growing foetus at about 800 cell divisions following egg fertilisation. The connection of the soul to the developing foetus remains limited until about 16 weeks into the pregnancy. As the foetus develops in the womb, all of the past life memories, or disabilities, are incorporated. After about 16 weeks, the soul decides whether all of the memories to be incorporated into the foetus have worked correctly. If they have not incorporated correctly, the foetus is miscarried. If incorporated correctly, the soul begins to draw itself into the body.

This drawing into the body by the soul has three stages:
[1] At about 16 weeks, the foetus is given life and begins to respond to the mother.
[2] At birth, or just before, enough of the soul is drawn into the body to be independent of the mother.
[3] At puberty, the final piece of the soul, that is to be incorporated into the body for this lifetime, is drawn in.

The soul is not located in a particular region of the body. The soul infuses every single body cell. The body takes the shape of the soul and the soul inhabits the body…or, at least, the “physical aspect” of the soul inhabits the body. The “higher aspect”, or higher self, remains outside of the physical body but, very closely connected with it.

However, in this lifetime, we are re-writing the rules.

To continue reading (it’s 12 pages), download the PDF version HERE.

[Note: This PDF was originally posted on the One-Vibration Forum on October 4, 2011.]

Mystery Blogger

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Mystery Blogger Image One
Image Credit: lauravent69.wordpress.com

Kristian got me, again. Thanks, Kristian! You are very, very kind. And, this is a new nomination. I have two Sunshines, one Recognition and one Liebster.

If you haven’t already, check Kristian out. He is very entertaining.

So, what is the Mystery Blogger Award?

“The Mystery Blogger Award is an award for amazing bloggers with ingenious posts. Their blog not only captivates, it inspires and motivates. They are one of the best out there and they deserve every recognition they get. This award is also for bloggers who find fun and inspiration in blogging and, they do it with so much love and passion.” ~ Okoto Enigma, creator of the award…

The Rules

[1] Put the award logo on your blog. (Done!)
[2] List the rules. (Done!)
[3] Thank whoever nominated you and include a link to their blog. (Done!)
[4] Mention the creator of the award and provide a link to their blog as well. (Done!)
[5] Tell your readers three things about yourself. (Done!)
[6] Nominate 10-20 people. (Wow, that is a lot…10 it is.)
[7] Notify your nominees. (Done!)
[8] Ask your nominees any five questions of your choice, specifying one weird/funny question. (I have no idea what to ask anyone but, I will try.)
[9] Share a link to your best post(s). (I don’t have a best post. I just have posts.)

Three Things About Me

[1] I have never been outside the U.S.
[2] I love anchovies on pizza.
[3] I have moved 23 times, across four states.

Questions From Kristian

[1] Name something you like to see in a book, that makes you want to read further.
[2] What would make you want to stop reading a book?
[3] If they produced the story of your life, what genre would it be?
[4] If you could have a plane ticket to anywhere in the world, where would you go?
[5] What advice would you like to give to your ten-year-old self?

My Answers

[1] If a book has supernatural qualities, I’m hooked.
[2] Verbosity. If you are using a string of $10 words and I have to go look them up or, you use 20 words when ten would have been sufficient, I’m done. Wordplay gymnastics is annoying and, as far as I am concerned, arrogant. Congratulations. You’re smart. And, I’m worn out…and bored.
[3] Direct-to-video drama with D-List actors. It would double as a sleep aid.
[4] Scotland.
[5] Ignore your parents’ drama and ask to live with your maternal Grandmother. Ignore the boys in school. They are SO much trouble.

My Nominees

(You are totally free to not participate.)
[1] Britchy
[2] Coffee
[3] Rakkelle
[4] Badfinger
[5] Hans
[6] Single Dad
[7] Past Due
[8] Lander
[9] J T Twissel
[10] Retro Roxi

My Questions

[1] If money were no object, what would you be doing?
[2] What vehicle would you like own?
[3] What is your favorite ride at an amusement park?
[4] Were you in any clubs or groups in high school?
[5] Got a funny pet story?

Shutterbug Saturday: Tribute Pictures V

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Austin Skyline Photo One
Austin Skyline
1st Street Bridge
Town Lake (Colorado River)
Photo Credit: Carlos Delgado on Unsplash

It appears that I have more Patton pictures than I realized. Some of them are of him, not by him. Nevertheless, this is looking like a seven part series, now.

Part I
Part II
Part III
Part IV

Roadrunner Photo Two
Roadrunner on the bird bath
06-04-2008
Roadrunner Photo Three
Getting a drink
08-27-2008
Forest Fire Photo Four
Clyde County Forest Fires
02-24-2009
Forest Fire Photo Five
Little too close for comfort
Forest Fire Photo Six
Dropping water
Forest Fire Photo Seven
Flame retardant
Abilene Parade Photo Eight
Abilene Parade
05-08-2008
Clydesdales Photo Nine
Budweiser Clydesdales

More to come… ~Vic

Foto Friday: Tribute Pictures Part IV

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Texas Photo One
Photo Credit: Glen Carrie on Unsplash

This is part four of a five, possibly, six part series showcasing my former supervisor W. H. Patton’s photography. The first post is here. The second post is here. The third post is here.

Round four…

Starlings Photo Two
Starlings everywhere…
10-09-2008
Starlings Photo Three
Backyard bird bath
10-09-2008
Fox Photo Four
Visiting fox
02-21-2008
Fox Photo Five
Another fox six days later
02-27-2008
Turkey Photo Six
Strutting gobbler
03-07-2009
Turkey Hens Photo Seven
Turkey hens on the bird bath
03-07-2009
Copper Photo Eight
His grandson’s puppy Copper
05-18-2008
Copper Photo Nine
Adorable Copper
05-18-2008

Throwback Thursday: Silent Sentinels 1917

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Silent Sentinels Photo One
Photo Credit: etsy.com

One hundred and two years ago, today, a group of women, organized by Women’s Rights Activist Alice Paul and the National Woman’s Party (NWP), began a picketing and protest campaign in front of the White House during the Wilson Presidency. Known as the Silent Sentinels, the protest began after a meeting with the President regarding suffrage proved fruitless with Wilson stating to the women to “…concert public opinion on behalf of women’s suffrage.” The silent protest was a new strategy for the National Suffrage Movement and served as a constant reminder of Wilson’s lack of support.

Silent Sentinels Photo Two
Photo Credit: equalmeansequal.org

Originally founded as the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage (CUWS) after the 1913 woman suffrage parade, they broke away from the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA), a more moderate group. CUWS only lasted three years and morphed into the NWP. The Suffragist was their weekly newsletter, containing essays, progress reports and notes on the President’s continuing indifference.

There were differing public reactions. Some approved, assisting with holding banners, bringing beverages and donating money. Some opposed their actions, including the leader of the NAWSA, Carrie Chapman Catt, whom preferred political tactics via individual states instead of a national amendment. She feared a male voter backlash.

Silent Sentinels Photo Three
Photo Credit: pinterest.com

Anti-suffragist mobs could be violent (worsening after the US entered World War I) spurred by the more insulting banners that compared Wilson to Kaiser Wilhelm. The New York Times called the protests “…silly, silent and offensive.” Massachusetts Representative Joseph Walsh referred to them as “…bewildered, deluded creatures with short skirts and short hair…” and “…nagging, iron-jawed angels.”

They were harassed, arrested, tortured and abused. Hunger strikes were met with forced feeding. On the night of November 14, 1917, known as the “Night of Terror“, the superintendent of the Occoquan Workhouse (prison), W.H. Whittaker, ordered the nearly forty guards to brutalize the suffragists. The treatment stories angered many Americans, creating more support. The protesters were finally released November 27 & 28, 1917, Alice Paul having spent five weeks there.

President Wilson finally announced his amendment support on January 8, 1918. The House barely passed the amendment the next day but, the Senate waited until October to vote. It failed by two votes. Protester arrests resumed August 6, 1918 and, by December, protestors were starting fires and burning Wilson effigies in front of the White House. Alice Paul encouraged people to vote against anti-suffrage Senators during the 1918 elections. The House, again, passed the amendment on May 21, 1919 and the Senate followed June 4 ending the six-day-a-week protest. The Nineteenth Amendment was adopted August 18, 1920.

See Iron Jawed Angels film.

Silent Sentinels Photo Four
Photo Credit: loc.gov

Wayback Wednesday: Apple iTunes & iPhones

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Steve Jobs iTunes Photo
Photo Credit: computerweekly.com

January 9 has been a very special day to Apple, Inc. On this day in 2001, Apple announced iTunes at MacWorld San Francisco, an application for Internet radio, music playing, ripping music from CDs and maintaining a library. The software ran on MacOS and Windows and, in 2003, you could download media from the iTunes Store. In 2005, Apple extended functionality for video and podcasts…University lectures in 2007 and, books in 2010. iTunes Radio, free music streaming, came in 2013 followed by Apple Music, paid music streaming, in 2015.

iTunes Logos Image
Image Credit: themusicsite.com

Apple has come under criticism for its digital rights management (DRM) encryption FairPlay. The protection of the music greatly limited what devices could play the files and brought about a movement to remove the restrictions. Steve Jobs penned an open letter to the music industry in February 2007. By April, non-DRM music appeared for download and the entire music catalog was DRM-free in January 2009.

1st Generation iPhone Image
Image Credit: igotoffer.com

On this day in 2007, Apple announced their first smartphone…again, at the MacWorld Conference & Expo in San Francisco. Quote from Steve Jobs:

“This is a day that I have been looking forward to for two and a half years. Today, Apple is going to reinvent the phone.”

From Wikipedia:
Apple created the device during a secretive and unprecedented collaboration with AT&T, formerly Cingular Wireless. The development cost of the collaboration was estimated to have been $150 million over a thirty-month period. Apple rejected the “design by committee” approach that had yielded the Motorola ROKR E1, a largely unsuccessful collaboration with Motorola. Instead, Cingular Wireless gave Apple the liberty to develop the iPhone’s hardware and software in-house. The whole effort was called Project Purple 2 and began in 2005. Six weeks before the iPhone was to be released, the plastic screen was replaced with a glass one, after Jobs was upset that the screen of the prototype he was carrying in his pocket had been scratched by his keys.

With the iPhone X costing $1,000 dollars, Apple rules the world.