Throwback Thursday: Bloody Sunday 1965

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Bloody Sunday Image
Photo Credit: nbcnews.com

Fifty-four years ago, today, the First March of the Selma to Montgomery marches took place. The planned marches were a response to the murder of Jimmie Lee Jackson by Alabama State Trooper James Fowler. Fowler shot Jackson on February 18, 1965, during a clash between, approximately, 500 protestors walking to Perry County Jail for James Orange and, Marion police officers, sheriff’s deputies and the state troopers. Jackson died from his injuries on February 26. Other casualties that night were two UPI photographers and NBC News correspondent Richard Valereani.

Bloody Sunday Image Two
Photo Credit: usatoday.com

The death of Jackson motivated James Bevel “to initiate and organize the first Selma to Montgomery march to present a way for the citizens of Marion and Selma to direct the anger over Jackson’s death into a positive outcome.Amelia Boynton assisted with the planning.

As the demonstrators crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, state, and county police, stopped the march and beat the protesters. Boynton was knocked unconscious and the photograph of her wounded body got the entire world’s attention.

The second march took place on March 9, referred to as Turnaround Tuesday. Though the march was peaceful due to a court order declaring no police interference, James Reeb was murdered that evening.

The third march to Montgomery spanned March 21 through March 24. By Thursday, March 25, the movement had reached the State Capitol Building. The murder of Viola Liuzzo was the final end to the violence and the 18 day struggle. Her murder, however, uncovered an FBI Informant, exposing J. Edgar Hoover‘s illegal activities.

The Voting Rights Act of 1965 was signed into law on August 6, 1965 and, the march route, the Selma To Montgomery Voting Rights Trail, is a designated National Historic Trail.

10 thoughts on “Throwback Thursday: Bloody Sunday 1965

    badfinger20 said:
    March 8, 2019 at 2:44 pm

    It’s a shame J. Edgar Hoover got to stay in that position as long as he did.

    Like

      The Hinoeuma responded:
      March 8, 2019 at 3:29 pm

      Ditto the Dulles brothers. Damn.

      Liked by 1 person

        badfinger20 said:
        March 8, 2019 at 3:51 pm

        Hoover done much worse but he chased Chaplin out and tried to get Lennon out before Hoover kicked it.

        Like

    bereavedandbeingasingleparent said:
    March 10, 2019 at 11:32 pm

    It’s frustrating that in the UK this is just not covered by schools or media. No documentaries. The mad world we live in would benefit from more people understanding what went in and the consequences. Making the same mistakes today

    Like

      The Hinoeuma responded:
      March 10, 2019 at 11:53 pm

      I didn’t even know about it. They don’t teach the shit here. I dig around, looking for historical stuff. More often than not, I am shocked by what I find…and what I don’t know.

      Like

    bottomlesscoffee007 said:
    March 13, 2019 at 4:36 pm

    Are we supposed to believe that the FBI or the department of justice is any different today?

    Like

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